“Santa Baby” is about a whore wanting expensive things from a married man

In a world where everything’s offensive because, well, people have too much time on their hands, it shouldn’t be surprising that Christmas songs are next on the list. First it was an attack on “Merry Christmas” and now it’s the holiday tunes you loved as a kid.

By now you’ve heard that a Cleveland radio station pulled the tune Baby, It’s Cold Outside from its playlist. All along I thought it was a publicity stunt to have a viral moment. My opinion hasn’t changed.

Other stations joined in on the ban saying the song is predatory since the female singer wants to leave but the other — a man — insists she stay.

Really? It’s come to this.

In a world of campaigns such as Me Too and Time’s Up, people allegedly feel the woman in the playful, flirty song could be in great danger. Because, yes, that’s exactly the kind of music they were producing in 1944 when it was written. (Even in the 1970s on TV you couldn’t show a married couple in bed together and you couldn’t even say the word “toilet” on a sitcom. It was a different time. Much different.)

While the critics are jumping on Baby, It’s Cold Outside, let me fuel the fire here. What about the song Santa Baby? That song is performed by a flirty materialistic homewrecker. Why aren’t people in an uproar about that 1950s song?

The singer sounds like she’s read to give Santa — a married man — a lap dance so she can get a bunch of expensive things. Where are the crusaders on something like this? Why isn’t that whore being called out?

See, I’m not easily offended but I can call out the ridiculousness of other people’s complaints. Nowadays you practically need to find a direct comparison and question somebody’s opinion with contradictions. In this case it’s Baby, It’s Cold Outside versus Santa Baby.

In one instance it’s not OK for the man to be in control but then in another it’s OK for a whore to insist a married dude “hurry down the chimney.” Umhmm. That’s not slutty at all.

It’s all in the interpretation. If you’re looking for something to be offensive, it’s not hard to twist that anymore. I guess the bigger question is: What do you gain from it? What’s the point? Do you really think impressionable children who are caught up with taking half-naked selfies and duck lips are listening to a 1940s song as gospel and saying, “Hey, I can do that”? Really? If you say they are, you’ve got major problems.

Worry more about today’s music that is hypersexual, aggressive and violent. Some of the songs out there make me feel like I’m going to be shot just listening to it. Compare that to a flirty innocent song like Baby, It’s Cold Outside and redo your playlist, radio stations. You’ll have a lot of dead air if you start to dissect every single song for “questionable” content.

To that I say: Get a life, people. There are far bigger things to worry about in life.

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